Cliff Sign

Cliff Sign

Coffin Bay

Coffin Bay Map

Coffin Bay Map

Coffin Bay is a holiday and fishing destination, on the western tip of the Eyre Peninsula – it is surrounded by the sea and national parks. Aquaculture is the major industry and the commercial fishermen operate out of the main wharf – while I was at the boat ramp I saw an oyster boat being towed ashore – baskets of oysters in the hull. There were fishermen filleting great looking fish at the boat ramp, and pelicans and seagulls clambering around for the remnants.

The town overlooks Port Douglas (another Queensland name!!) – part of a huge bay system – many islands where seals and sea birds breed. There are pods of dolphins I’m told, but I’m not fortunate enough to see any, and as it is getting late, I make my way to Kellidie Bay Conservation Park to have a quick look at the bay there, hoping to glimpse the dolphins.  I am heading to a camp closer to Warrow so that I can get to Ceduna by Friday morning.

Coffin Bay Boats

Coffin Bay Boats

Coffin Bay Oyster Boat

Coffin Bay Oyster Boat

Coffin Bay Pelicans

Coffin Bay Pelicans

Warrow – Cummings Monument – Lake Hamilton –Locks Well – Elliston –Talia Caves – Port Kenny –  Murphy’s Haystacks – Eyre’s Waterhole Campsite

I left the campsite – headed north-west and saw a monument sign so decided to investigate – what a find – rugged coastline with a natural monument (similar to an apostle) – 2 Queensland surfers camping there told me how to get the best photo – and a monument to a Lew Cummings who was lost at sea in 1959 when his fishing cutter was wrecked.

Not very far along I discovered the Lake Hamilton Eating House – a restored cottage which was used as an eating house for travellers between the 1850’s – 1880’s. It was part of the Sheringa Run and is testament to the long history in this area. At Sheringa town-ship I see a quaint church standing in a paddock with a little white picket fence – so picturesque.

I’m travelling through very rocky landscape (some inventive farmers have made rock walls for fences, as there are so many rocks), to get to Lock’s Well – I’ve been told it is spectacular. I park the bus at the top car park as the sign directs me and head down the hill via many dirt steps to the lookout on the beach. Once there was a chain that had to be scaled but thankfully now there are steps – 298 of them to be exact!!  Great going down, but challenging on return!! This is at the southern end of Anxious Bay and the rock formations are super. Salmon fishing is taking place on the beach.

I’m heading to Elliston for a look and to have lunch on the foreshore – The murals in town and the art work in the park are great.  There have been many shipwrecks in this area as it relied heavily on shipping. The jetty is an historic one built in 1900. Wheat and wool were shipped from Elliston and there is information about the wheat stacks at the jetty.

I have been told about Talia Caves so I’m off to explore – 7 kilometres of corrugated dirt – but extremely worth the drive – WOW – the difference in the rock formations from one end of Anxious Bay to the other is stunning.  The colours in the rock layers here are dramatic and I’d love to see them at sunset.  There are two different caves – Woolshed Cave – a large cave which one could go into and explore, and the Hub which was a smaller but just as spectacular cave which had an opening where the sea could enter. Impressive – nature at its finest.  I found it strange that there had to be a sign warning people not to drive close to the cliffs!!

I fuelled up at Port Kenny, and on my way to the campsite I saw a sign Murphy’s Haystacks 2 kilometres – I’d read about these so decided to add them to the list of an already mind-blowing day.  They did not disappoint – very unusual rock formations – just sitting atop a hill in a paddock. One actually looks like wave rock and others like huge boulders.

I finally made it to Eyre’s Waterhole for the night – this is where Eyre and his party camped and used the well to replenish their supplies – he stated that the water was 5 to 7 inches deep and kept replenishing itself. The well is well-preserved and not too far from the campsite.  There are five vans in the camp tonight and we’re all Queenslanders.

Cummings Monument Coastline

Cummings Monument Coastline

Cummings Monument Apostle

Cummings Monument Apostle

Cummings Monument

Cummings Monument

Lake Hamilton Eating House

Lake Hamilton Eating House

Lake Hamilton Eating House

Lake Hamilton Eating House

Sheringa Rock Walls

Sheringa Rock Walls

Sheringa Church

Sheringa Church

Locks Well Path

Locks Well Path

Locks Well Beach

Locks Well Beach

Locks Well Steps

Locks Well Steps

Elliston Historic Jetty

Elliston Historic Jetty

Elliston Statue

Elliston Statue

Shipwrecks

Shipwrecks

Wheatstacks

Wheatstacks

Talia Caves Road

Talia Caves Road

Woolshed Cave

Woolshed Cave

Woolshed Cave Rocks

Woolshed Cave Rocks

Paula at Woolshed Cave

Paula at Woolshed Cave

The Hub Cave

The Hub Cave

The Hub

The Hub

Murphy's Haystacks

Murphy’s Haystacks

Murphy's Haystacks

Murphy’s Haystacks

Eyre Peninsula Explorers

Eyre Peninsula Explorers

Eyre's Water Hole Information

Eyre’s Water Hole Information

Cooeyanna Well (Eyre's Water Hole)

Cooeyanna Well (Eyre’s Water Hole)

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