Saddleworth – Riverton – Rhynie – Auburn –Penwortham – Clare – Spalding

Judy was ill at breakfast so Evelyn took her to Riverton Hospital, so I cleaned up and went over to the bus to organise it – the dust needed removing and the hut had to be cleaned before showering.  I washed and then swept the bbq area and mopped it to try to help Evelyn who has bad sciatica. Judy was admitted to hospital – suspect muscular damage but query heart attack.

All set to hit the road again after morning tea so I set off to Riverton to get the gas filled.  From there I went to Rhynie – I’d never been on this road – there’s really just a pub and a hamlet – surrounded by farmland.  Today the farmers are burning off the stubble so the breathing is a bit laboured.  From Auburn I travelled to Clare to fill up and get a few groceries before heading to Spalding.

I come across an unusual entrance way to a farm stay – a wagon perched high above the driveway – very effective advertising. Kangaroos are enjoying feasting on the stubble in some of the paddocks – I’m glad I don’t travel at night in this country.

The road winds through undulating hills of gold – interspersed with new plantings of green. The town is bordered to the south-west by the Yackamoorundie Range merging with the Never Never Range (what fabulous names these ranges have). Towards Spalding the hills remind me of Peterborough country and it is no surprise that I find wind farms on distant hills(the Camel Hump Range).  I found a parking area about 1 ½ kilometres from Spalding – a nice treed barbecue area, so decide to pull over and go for a walk into Spalding to sightsee. I’m only about 180 kilometres north of Adelaide today.

I went to the information centre in the council offices, and armed myself with some pamphlets on the place. The town walk includes the Pub, which has an amazing collection of barbed wire and fencing equipment (collected over forty years), it was well worth a look. The hotel was first licenced in 1877. There are the usual historic stone buildings – former shops and churches as well as a grandstand at the oval. Trout fishing is very popular in the Broughton River.

The Morgan Whyalla pipelines run parallel to each other on the southern edge of town – the first pipeline was constructed in 1941 to supply fresh water to the industrial town of Whyalla – the second was constructed in 1964.

It only took me 15 minutes to walk from the park to town so a very pleasant stroll around town and then back to camp for dinner and blogging. The wind is very strong here tonight.

Saddleworth Golden Fields

Saddleworth Golden Fields

Saddleworth Welcome Sigh

Saddleworth Welcome Sigh

Burnoff at Rhynie

Burnoff at Rhynie

Rhynie Smoke Haze

Rhynie Smoke Haze

Rhynie to Auburn

Rhynie to Auburn

Clare Valley Vineyards

Clare Valley Vineyards

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Clare Valley Racecourse

Clare Valley Racecourse

Farmstay Entrance

Farmstay Entrance

Farmstay Wagon

Farmstay Wagon

Kangaroos at Spalding

Kangaroos at Spalding

Spalding Country

Spalding Country

Livin' at Spalding Campsite

Livin’ at Spalding Campsite

Riverbank at Campsite

Riverbank at Campsite

Campsite Trees

Campsite Trees

Spalding Information

Spalding Information

Spalding Streetscape

Spalding Streetscape

Spalding Country

Spalding Country

Water Pipes

Water Pipes

Barbed Wire Pub

Barbed Wire Pub

Barbed Wire Display

Barbed Wire Display

Fencing Tools

Fencing Tools

Barbed Wire Collection

Barbed Wire Collection

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